21. June 2024

Optimize Blender CYCLES & EEVEE for fast Render Settings: Performance Guide (2024)

optimize blender cycles eevee fastest render settings performance guide

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Table of Content


Intro

rotating blender meme

Hey Blenderheads!

We’ve all been there: that heart-sinking moment when your viewport stutters, your renders crawl, and Blender seems to be conspiring against you. Fear not! Even with all the advancements Blender has made, optimizing performance remains a crucial skill. Today, we’ll unlock the hidden power of your setup and transform your Blender experience from frustrating to seamless with over 100 tips that have saved me countless hours.

Note: I have wanted to create this guide for a long time and finally got around to writing it. Fundamentally, this guide is designed to be universal across all rendering software, such as Maya, 3DS Max, or game engines like Unreal Engine, Unity, or Godot. So if you learn something new here, you can apply these mindsets and tips to your favorite 3D software with a bit of creative adaptation. 😊

Before we start, please remember the following acronym and share it with your friends who always complain about performance. I made it up to encourage a bit of self-reflection.

IATB: “I am the bottleneck

lost john travolta meme

Blender Guide Overview

Jokes aside, this guide is structured into multiple stages: Mindset, Shading/Materials, Geometry, and Rendering. While improving performance is an ongoing endeavor, my goal is to help you see Blender from a different perspective and hopefully enhance your workflow a bit, enabling you to create larger and more complex scenes with fewer annoying performance hiccups or, heaven forbid, crashes!

About Me

christopher schiefer artist author

Let me quickly introduce myself. I am Christopher Schiefer. I’ve been using Blender since version 2.42 back in 2006, and it has been my go-to software for 3D ever since. My journey includes being a technical artist starting from Unreal Engine 1, a graphics engineer in various 3D software, a concept artist, and an art director. I’ve seen this software from multiple perspectives—from programmer to artist. I hope this guide provides you with insights you might not have encountered before.


Mindset and Computer Science Crash Course

The More You Know, The Better 🧐

Our goal is to improve viewport and render performance for Rasterization (Eevee) or Pathtracing (Cycles) in Blender. To achieve this, we must step back and understand what our goal truly is.

We aim to reduce computational and memory read/write complexity on the GPU (Graphics Processing Unit), CPU (Central Processing Unit), VRAM (Video Random-Access Memory), and RAM (Random-Access Memory) or, worse, your hard drive. We want to leverage L3, L2, L1 Caches, hardware-level features like RT Cores, Tensor Cores, Instancing, and reduce the amount of data—or more accurately, bytes—we move back and forth between different stages in the rendering lifecycle.

confused girl meme

Blender Cheat Sheet

Now that we have our mindset straight, we need to create a mental map of what we generally want to optimize. I’ve created a cheat sheet for you to bookmark, share with your struggling friends, and use as a checklist for your projects. 😄

Shader Optimization

Memory Optimization

Avoid ❌Why ❔Solution ✔️Example 📗
Too many texture readsMemory reads are very slow, especially if you read too many bytes from VRAM.Reduce the number of textures accessed from VRAM or disk. Each material should reference as few textures as possible, with the lowest necessary resolution and number of channels.performance texture reads alt text
Too many channels per texture (RGBA)Each channel adds extra data! A 1024x1024 texture with 4 channels (RGBA) at 8 bytes per channel can total 1024x1024x4x8 = 33,554,432 bits. This is a lot of texels/bytes for your VRAM/RAM to handle and to load from disk!Use RGB channel masks instead of RGBA grayscale textures.performance channels alt text
Too many channels for normal maps (RGB)Normal maps can often use only the R and G channels, with the B channel calculated.Store only the necessary channels and reconstruct the B channel using the formula: z = ((1 - ((2x-1)^2 + (2y-1)^2))^2) / 2 + 0.5performance normal map compression alt text
Relying too much on color mapsOften, you can use a single grayscale mask and do procedural texturing instead. This saves texture reads and leverages more compute power.Remove color maps if they are simple and use grayscale masks instead.performance procedural mask alt text
Storing too much redundant information in a textureIt’s unnecessary to store texels that are perceptually similar if they add no benefit to the final scene.Crop your patterns or seamless textures if they look too repetitive.performance tileable savings alt text
Relying too much on photo texturesPhoto textures are generally difficult to compress and often too high-resolution.Use normal maps and understand the natural effects you see. Break them down to their simplest parts. For example, use a tiled rotated gradient to achieve the same effect in 3D rather than 2D.performance faking too much alt text
Too many alpha channels in useUsing alpha channels is quite expensive in computer graphics.Use a grayscale texture for opacity instead, at a lower resolution with higher compression.performance alpha channel alt text
Use of non-square texturesVRAM handles power-of-two textures better, such as 128x128, 256x256, 512x512, etc.Use square textures and follow the power-of-two sizes.performance power of two alt text
Unused texture spaceUnused texels don’t affect the final image but still consume VRAM.Crop your images and re-evaluate your workflow.performance unused texture space alt text
Too high resolution for no perceptual differenceMore texels mean more rendering time.Resize textures. Start by reducing 4096x4096 textures to 1024x1024 or even 512x512, depending on the perceptual difference.performance too high res alt text

Computation Optimization

Avoid ❌Why ❔Solution ✔️Example 📗
Procedural noise for negligible perceptual impact4D, 3D, or even 2D procedural noise is computationally expensive. It’s better to use noise textures across multiple shaders.Store different noise textures in each RGB channel.performance precoumpute noise alt text
Expensive procedural maskingEach extra instruction, such as ray-traced AO or ray-traced bevels, is very expensive!Use color attributes and store AO and edges in the RG channels instead.performance avoid expensive rays alt text
Too many reducible instructionsMath operations can be simplified to reduce instructions on the CPU or GPU.Look for ways to remove redundant functions/nodes or arithmetic. For example, multiple HSL nodes can often be combined into one or baked into a texture.performance simplify hsl alt text
Using expensive differential bump nodesComputing bump maps on the fly is expensive because it uses differential instructions like ddx/ddy.Use normal maps instead.performance bump node alt text
Using box mapping (naive tri-planar)Box mapping requires six texture reads, which is very slow.Use UV cube projection for correct normal maps. Although it creates a hard edge, it’s usually not noticeable. Alternatively, use stochastic tri-planar mapping for just one texture read, though it may add some noise.performance box mapping alt text
Too many expensive nodesSome nodes involve costly instructions, such as divide, or multiple embedded functions like HSL or Principled BSDF, often not all of which are used.Minimize the use of complex nodes as much as possible.performance node alt text
Use of volume scatteringVolume scattering is extremely expensive.Use a compositing pass with a depth pass or an emissive volume instead. This avoids extra rays and can significantly boost performance.performance volume scatter alt text
Too many materialsEach material requires compilation and is harder to manage, reducing rendering performance.Use uber materials with attributes.performance materials alt text
Avoiding backface cullingBackface culling can prevent shading and rasterizing of backfaces, reducing overdraw and shading cost per pixel.Enable backface culling. Fix normals if needed: in Edit Mode, go to Mesh > Normals and choose Flip (Alt+N), Recalculate Outside (Shift+N), or Recalculate Inside (Shift+Ctrl+N) based on your needs.performance backface culling alt text
Alpha blending overdrawAlpha blending causes overdraw and sorting issues, slowing down rendering.Use Opaque (fastest) > Alpha Clip (fast) > Alpha Hashed (medium).performance alpha blend alt text
this is fine burning meme

Memory and Computation Optimization

Avoid ❌Why ❔Solution ✔️Example 📗
Too many unique materials per objectEach material adds an extra draw call and requires more shader evaluation and compilation.Use texture atlases or UDIMs to consolidate materials.performance atlas alt text
Too high-quality texture filteringBi-cubic filtering reads the texture four times versus nearest, which reads only once, and linear is hardware-accelerated.Choose lower-quality filtering where appropriate.performance texture filtering alt text

Geometry Optimization

Memory Optimization

Avoid ❌Why ❔Solution ✔️Example 📗
Unused / Redundant AttributesAttributes consume memory and need to be loaded into VRAM. It can be time consuming and also increase memory usage.Remove or combine attributes and optimize your shaders to use less attributes!performance remove attribute alt text
Unused Custom Split Normals DataCustom split normals data consumes memory and often doesn’t produce a substantial difference in visuals.Press clear custom split normal data in your object data properties.performance clear custom normals alt text

Computation Optimization

Avoid ❌Why ❔Solution ✔️Example 📗
OverdrawOverdraw is a substantial computation hog when utilizing transparency. It is inefficient to draw multiple triangles on top of each other. This is especially important when tracing transparent rays.Manually cut the mesh to avoid as much empty space as possible while keeping the polycount as low as possible.performance cut transparent meshes alt text
Too Many Draw CallsEach time an object or material is rendered, it is an additional draw call. The more draw calls, the more CPU and GPU instructions there are.Batch / Merge multiple materials and meshes into one, especially if the complexity of meshes or materials is low.performance draw calls alt text
Too Many Long TrianglesLong triangles can be inefficient to render in rasterization and raytracing because rasterization works in 2x2 pixel groups and raytracing uses bounding boxes to represent a triangle soup.Instead of using Ngons or long triangles, always determine how to best fill an area (Grid fill / Triangulate Clip). Plan your topology ahead of time!performance long triangles alt text
Too Many Triangles Per PixelIf triangles are smaller or as big as 1 pixel, then you will have a large drop-off in performance due to 2x2 pixel rasterization. Raytracing can handle it a little better, but it is inefficient to do so!Use LOD, especially for distant geometry.performance lod alt text

Memory and Computation Optimization

Avoid ❌Why ❔Solution ✔️Example 📗
Double VerteciesWe can have vertices or entire faces that are exactly at the same location, making no visual difference to the model. This can happen when you import or edit meshes.Edit Mode > Select All > Mesh > Merge > By Distance.performance remove double vertecies alt text
Unique Mesh SymmetrySymmetry doesn’t equal to performance! Each unique extra triangle will cost you performance.Split your mesh and duplicate as an instance (ALT+D)!performance symmetry alt text
Too Many TrianglesEach triangle will cost you performance.Decimate or Un-Subdivide your meshes. The final render quality is often very similar.performance simplify meshes alt text

Note:

  1. Do you see how we generally have to improve for Memory efficiency? This is because memory read/write on your precious VRAM is very difficult and slow to do in modern hardware.
  2. Rule of thumb: The less complex your material the more geometry you can have. Vice versa the more complex your material the less geometry you can have.

Blender Rendering Optimization

Quick Tips for Efficient Rendering

TipDescription
Rasterization vs. Path TracingChoose rasterization if full path tracing is not necessary.
Reduce Samples per PixelMinimize the number of samples to lower rendering time.
Disable Unnecessary FeaturesTurn off features that don’t significantly impact the final visual quality.
Limit Light Sources and ShadowsUse the fewest lights and shadows possible to maintain performance.
Avoid Transparent Bounces in CyclesTransparent bounces can cause significant performance drops.

Rendering Settings

SettingLocationDescription
ClampingRender Properties > Light PathsControls the maximum brightness of individual light samples. Lowering can reduce noise and fireflies.
Direct LightingLight Paths > ClampingSet to 0 for unbiased results. Can set to 1 to reduce noise in complex light setups.
Indirect LightingLight Paths > ClampingGenerally set to 0.1 for animations to reduce noise while maintaining path-traced appearance.
CausticsRender Properties > Light PathsDisable Reflective and Refractive caustics to speed up renders and reduce noise.
Min Light BouncesRender Properties > Light PathsSet to the total bounces to reduce noise.
Min Transparent BouncesRender Properties > Light PathsSame as Min Light Bounces, reduces reliance on stochastic noise.
Light TreeRender Properties > LightsUse for scenes with many lights, but avoid for low light counts due to computational overhead.
Optix vs. Open Image Denoise (OID)Render Properties > DenoisingOptix is faster, but OID (GPU) is recommended for better results with RTX cards.
Threads ModeRender Properties > PerformanceSet to fixed and use CPU threads -1 for better balance between CPU and GPU tasks.
TilingRender Properties > PerformanceDisable for faster rendering if not dealing with large resolution images. Enable if low VRAM.
Persistent DataRender Properties > PerformanceKeeps BVH and other data cached to speed up repeated renders.
Viewport Pixel SizeRender Properties > ViewportSet to 2x or auto to reduce pixel count for ray tracing in heavy scenes.

Quick tip for Launching Blender Faster

performance start blender faster

A quick tip I always recommend:

Before saving your Blender file, always disable all collections and set the shading mode to Solid Shading.

Why? This will prevent shader compilation issues and avoid freezing your UI when you or your team members open the blend file.

Blender Keymap Settings for Efficiency

Some of the Keymap settings I use to enhance productivity by leveraging the mouse and keyboard more effectively.

performance keymap settings
SettingDescriptionBenefit
Select with Mouse Button: RightConfigures the right mouse button to select objects in Blender.Separates selection from manipulation actions, providing precise control and aligning with Blender’s traditional workflow.
Spacebar Action: SearchAssigns the spacebar to open the search menu.Allows quick access to any tool or command, significantly speeding up the workflow by reducing menu navigation.
Select All TogglesEnables the selection of all objects using a toggle method.Simplifies multi-object selection, making it easier to manage large scenes and perform batch operations.
Tab for Pie MenuUses the Tab key to open a pie menu.Provides a fast and intuitive way to access commonly used tools, improving efficiency with minimal key presses.

Blender Viewport Optimization Settings

performance render settings
SettingLocationDescription
Enable Frame DroppingTimeline Editor > Playback > Sync > Frame DroppingPrioritizes smooth frame rate by dropping frames.
Simplify Viewport SettingsProperties Editor > Render Properties > SimplifySet Max Subdivision, Child Particles, Texture Limit, and Volume Resolution to 0.
Subdivision LevelsProperties Editor > Object DataAdjust Preview and Render subdivision levels to balance performance and visual fidelity.
Texture ResolutionProperties Editor > Object Data > Viewport DisplayLower the resolution for better performance in the viewport.
Hidden Object VisibilityOutlinerTemporarily disable hidden objects to improve viewport performance.

Automating Blender Viewport Optimization with Python

To stay fast and efficient I recommend creating add-ons or scripts to quickly apply optimizations to your project.

Here’s a little example of a script to automate viewport optimization:

import bpy

def optimize_viewport():
    # Frame Dropping
    bpy.context.scene.sync_mode = 'FRAME_DROPPING'

    # Simplify
    for area in bpy.context.screen.areas:
        if area.type == 'VIEW_3D':
            for space in area.spaces:
                if space.type == 'VIEW_3D':
                    space.shading.render_pass = 'COMBINED'
                    space.shading.studio_light = 'MEDIUM'
                    space.shading.light = 'FLAT'
                    space.shading.color_type = 'TEXTURE'
                    space.overlay.show_floor = False
                    space.overlay.show_axis_x = False
                    space.overlay.show_axis_y = False
                    space.overlay.show_extras = False
                    space.overlay.show_relationship_lines = False
                    space.overlay.show_outline_selected = False

optimize_viewport()

Sculpting Optimization

SettingLocationDescription
Dyntopo Detail SizeSculpt Mode > Active Tool > DyntopoUse larger detail sizes for initial shaping, decrease for finer details.
RemeshingSculpt Mode > RemeshReduce polygon count without losing detail for performance improvements.
Multires LevelsSculpt Mode > MultiresolutionSculpt at different levels of detail to improve performance by reducing the real-time polygon count.

Geometry Nodes Optimization

OptimizationDescription
Field CachingStores node outputs in memory, preventing recalculations on every frame or change.
Instance AttributesUse to create variations from a single base mesh, reducing memory usage.
Optimize Node ExecutionAnalyze and rearrange nodes to avoid unnecessary calculations and data flow redundancies.

Animation Optimization

OptimizationDescription
Simplify ArmaturesUse fewer bones to simplify rigs while maintaining the necessary range of motion.
Bake AnimationsPre-calculate animations to keyframes to reduce real-time processing during playback and rendering.
Optimize ModifiersAdjust settings or apply modifiers when not needed to improve performance.

General Optimization

Asset Management

TaskDescription
Purge Unused Data BlocksFile > Clean Up > Purge All. Removes unused assets and data blocks.
Organize AssetsUse Collections to group related objects and materials.
Link Assets ExternallyLink from external files to reduce file size and memory usage for large projects.

Observation and Performance Monitoring

ToolDescription
Viewport StatisticsEnable in Viewport Overlays to see real-time performance metrics.
Render Time EstimatesCheck the Render Properties tab for time estimates.
System Resource MonitorUse OS tools to track CPU, GPU, and RAM usage during Blender work to identify bottlenecks.

Hardware Considerations

While upgrading your hardware can boost your scene’s performance, it’s not always the best solution, especially when you’re working in a team environment, like in a studio.

In team projects, knowing how to optimize your scenes is super important. Without these skills, your work will slow down the entire team, making things frustrating for everyone.

So, while a faster computer can help, learning and using performance optimization techniques will make you a team hero, ensuring everything runs smoothly and everyone stays happy! 😄

ComponentWhy It’s ImportantWhat You Should Look For
CPU (Central Processing Unit)The brain of your computer, handling all core operations, simulations, and rendering.Go for a fast, multi-core processor like the AMD Ryzen 9 or Intel Core i9 to keep things running snappily, especially for complex tasks.
GPU (Graphics Processing Unit)Crucial for rendering in Blender’s Cycles and EEVEE, and ensuring smooth viewport performance.A powerful GPU like NVIDIA RTX 30/40 series or AMD Radeon RX 6000/7000 series with at least 8GB of VRAM (12-24GB is even better) will make a huge difference for detailed scenes.
RAM (Random Access Memory)Keeps all your active scene data readily accessible, essential for large projects.Aim for at least 32GB to smoothly handle big scenes, simulations, and high-poly modeling.
SSD (Solid State Drive)Speeds up loading and saving your Blender files and textures.Use a fast NVMe SSD as your main drive to quickly access and load your projects.
MotherboardConnects all your components, supporting high-speed data transfer and expansions.Choose a motherboard that matches your CPU, offers multiple PCIe slots for GPU upgrades, and supports high-speed RAM (like DDR4/DDR5).
MonitorYour window into Blender, where resolution and color accuracy are key.A 1440p to 4K monitor with good color accuracy (preferably an IPS panel) lets you see your work in great detail and true colors.
Multi-GPU SetupEnhances rendering power by using more than one GPU for Blender’s Cycles engine.If you need even more rendering speed and your system supports it, consider adding multiple GPUs.
Dedicated Render FarmFrees up your computer by offloading heavy rendering tasks to external systems.Use a render farm or cloud services to handle big rendering jobs, leaving your computer free for other tasks.
UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply)Protects your work from unexpected power outages.A UPS can save your data and prevent work disruption during long render sessions or critical tasks.
Ergonomic SetupKeeps you comfortable during long hours of work.Invest in a good chair, adjustable desk, and monitor stands to stay comfortable and productive.
GPU Memory (VRAM)Handles large textures, shaders, and high-poly models efficiently.Make sure your GPU has at least 8GB of VRAM; 12-24GB is best for more detailed and high-resolution work.
PCIe NVMe DrivesProvides faster data transfer, perfect for Blender’s data-heavy operations.Opt for PCIe 4.0 NVMe drives for the fastest read/write speeds, crucial for large Blender files.
Thunderbolt PortsEnables high-speed connections for peripherals and storage devices.Thunderbolt 3 or 4 ports are great for hooking up fast external drives and additional monitors.
Memory CoolingKeeps your RAM cool during intense Blender tasks.Use RAM with built-in heat spreaders or add extra cooling to keep everything running smoothly.
Dedicated VRAM (for Textures)Essential for managing large textures and detailed models without lag.Ensure your GPU has ample VRAM to efficiently handle textures and detailed meshes.
High-Speed RAMBoosts Blender’s performance in managing complex scenes and simulations.Choose high-speed RAM (e.g., 3200MHz DDR4 or faster) to enhance data processing and performance.

Conclusion

Optimizing Blender is an ongoing process. Improve your workflow and continuously learn to push the boundaries of what’s possible.

If you need help? You can absolutely reach out for a mentorship at christopher@cgverse.com. I’d love to help you master Blender.

futurama fry take my money meme

Vertex Color Attributes for Masking

To efficiently merge multiple materials we often have to utilize masks. I made this quick tutorial for you to show you an overview of how to achieve some of the optimizations shown in Shader Optimization.

funny dog eyes meme
StepDescriptionImage
1Open the Color Attributes panel and click on the “+” button to add a new color attribute.Adding a new color attribute in Blender.
2Name the attribute Color, set the Domain to Vertex, and choose Byte Color for the Data Type. Click OK.Naming the color attribute and setting its domain and data type.
3Go to the Edge menu and select Subdivide to add more geometry for storing information.Subdividing edges in Blender to add more geometry.
4Switch to Vertex Paint mode to begin painting the vertices of your model.Switching to Vertex Paint mode in Blender.
5Select the color you want to paint with, for example, red (R=1, G=0, B=0).Choosing red color for vertex painting in Blender.
6Use the Add blending mode to apply red paint. This allows for adding multiple RGB colors separately.Applying red paint using Add blending mode in Blender.
7Change the color to green (R=0, G=1, B=0) and apply using the Add mode to paint a different area.Applying green paint on a different section in Blender.
8Finally, switch to blue (R=0, G=0, B=1) and paint another section of your model. Each channel can be used independently.Applying blue paint to another section in Blender.
9To modify or remove color from a channel, switch to the Subtract mode.Using Subtract mode to remove color from a channel in Blender.
10In the Shader Editor, add a Color Attribute node by pressing Shift + A and searching for “attribute”.Adding a Color Attribute node in Blender's Shader Editor.
11Add a Separate XYZ node to split the color into its R, G, and B components.Adding a Separate XYZ node to split color in Blender.
12Connect the Color Attribute node to the Separate XYZ node to use the R, G, and B channels as masks.Connecting Color Attribute to Separate XYZ node for RGB masks.
13Use Mix nodes to create unique materials with the vertex masks. Each channel can control different aspects of the material.Creating unique materials with vertex masks using Mix nodes.
14The result is a model with separate vertex color masks that can be used efficiently in shaders.Final result showing a model with vertex color masks in Blender.

This guide should help you efficiently use vertex color attributes for shader masking in Blender.

You can create very efficient and also complex shaders with this method. 💯

Resources

I wanted to provide some of the resources for you. I very much recommend using those in your blend files to optimize your scenes.
When your coworkers see you using those they will find it useful as well.🔥

cat meme huh
ResourceDescription
vfx noiseVFX Noise texture to create complex materials efficiently.
R-Channel = FBM Noise
G-Channel = Leaking
B-Channel = generic concrete

Blender Material Compendium

I’ve created this comprehensive compendium of all nodes to give you a clear reference and use case for each one when optimizing your shaders.

I hope it helps! 😄

NodeDescriptionNode SetupCyclesEevee
Ambient OcclusionThis node setup uses the Ambient Occlusion node to generate occlusion data which is then fed into an Emission shader. This can be useful for stylized lighting effects or to highlight occluded areas. For better performance, you can lower the Samples value. Only Local can be checked to compute occlusion for close geometry only, reducing processing time.blender node ambient occlusion node setupambient occlusion cyclesambient occlusion eevee
AttributeThis node setup utilizes the Attribute node to read UV Map data, which is then connected to an Emission shader. This is helpful for accessing custom attributes like UV maps for specific texturing effects. Ensure the ‘Name’ field matches the attribute name exactly. To optimize performance, use only the attributes necessary for your shader to avoid excess calculations.blender node attribute node setupattribute cyclesattribute eevee
BevelThe Bevel node in this setup is used to create smooth shading effects on edges, connected to an Emission shader to visualize the effect. Adjusting the Radius and Samples can help balance between performance and visual quality. For performance, lower the Samples or increase the Radius slightly to reduce computational load.blender node bevel node setupbevel cyclesbevel eevee
Camera Data View VectorThis node setup takes the View Vector from the Camera Data node and uses it directly in an Emission shader. This can create effects that change based on the camera’s position. To optimize, ensure that the calculations dependent on the View Vector are minimized to avoid performance hits during complex scene renders.blender node camera data view vector node setupcamera data view vector cyclescamera data view vector eevee
Camera Data View Vector Z DepthThis setup uses the View Z Depth from the Camera Data node, mapped through a Map Range node, and then into an Emission shader. This is ideal for creating depth-based effects. Adjust the ‘From Min’ and ‘From Max’ values in the Map Range node to control the depth range. For performance, avoid overly small ranges which can cause high-frequency updates during rendering.blender node camera data view vector z depth node setupcamera data view vector z depth cyclescamera data view vector z depth eevee
Camera Data View DistanceIn this setup, the View Distance from the Camera Data node is mapped using a Map Range node to modulate an Emission shader. This can create distance-based effects. Use the Clamp option to prevent values from exceeding the defined range, and adjust the ‘From’ values for different distance thresholds. To improve performance, ensure the range covers only the necessary distances.blender node camera data view distance node setupcamera data view distance cyclescamera data view distance eevee
Color AttributeThe Color Attribute node is used here to access color data from vertex colors or other attributes. This data is then connected to an Emission shader. Make sure to select the correct attribute in the node settings. For better performance, use the Color Attribute node only when necessary to avoid additional processing for unused data.blender node color attribute node setupcolor attribute cyclescolor attribute eevee
Curves Info Is StrandThis setup uses the ‘Is Strand’ output from the Curves Info node, which can differentiate between curve types. This is connected to an Emission shader to visualize the effect. It’s useful for hair or particle systems. Performance can be optimized by using this node selectively, applying it only where curve differentiation is required.blender node curves info is strand node setupcurves info is strand cyclescurves info is strand eevee
Curves Info InterceptThe Intercept output from the Curves Info node gives the relative length of a point along a curve. This is used here to drive an Emission shader. This can create effects that vary along the length of a curve. To optimize performance, use the Intercept node judiciously and only when the varying effect along the curve length is essential.blender node curves info intercept node setupcurves info intercept cyclescurves info intercept eevee
Curves Info LengthIn this setup, the Length output from the Curves Info node is used to drive an Emission shader, which can be useful for visualizing curve lengths or creating length-based effects. Ensure that the Length data is necessary for your shader’s effect to optimize performance, as this node calculates based on the entire curve.blender node curves info length node setupcurves info length cyclescurves info length eevee
Curves Info ThicknessThis setup uses the Thickness output from the Curves Info node, multiplied by a value using a Math node, and then connected to an Emission shader. This allows you to create thickness-based effects. Adjust the multiplier in the Math node to control the effect. For performance, use simpler calculations and avoid excessive multipliers that might slow down rendering.blender node curves info thickness node setupcurves info thickness cyclescurves info thickness eevee
Curves Info Tangent NormalHere, the Tangent Normal output from the Curves Info node is connected to an Emission shader. This can be used to create shading effects that depend on the tangent direction of curves. Ensure this effect is necessary for your shader to avoid extra computation. Consider simplifying the shader if the tangent effect is not crucial.blender node curves info tangent normal node setupcurves info tangent normal cyclescurves info tangent normal eevee
Curves Info RandomThe Random output from the Curves Info node provides a random value for each curve, which can be used in the Emission shader for effects like randomizing color or intensity. This is useful for procedural textures and variations. To optimize, limit the number of operations using the random value to prevent performance degradation.blender node curves info random node setupcurves info random cyclescurves info random eevee
FresnelThis node setup uses the Fresnel node to create a faceted effect, which is then fed into an Emission shader. The Index of Refraction (IOR) can be adjusted to control the strength of the Fresnel effect. To improve performance, choose an IOR value that balances visual quality and computation cost. Use this effect sparingly to avoid slowing down render times.blender node fresnel node setupfresnel cyclesfresnel eevee
Geometry PositionThe Position output from the Geometry node is connected to an Emission shader, allowing you to create effects based on object or world coordinates. This can be used for position-based shading effects. For better performance, use position data only when necessary and simplify any operations involving these coordinates.blender node geometry position node setupgeometry position cyclesgeometry position eevee
Geometry NormalIn this setup, the Normal output from the Geometry node is connected to an Emission shader. This can be used to create effects based on surface normals, such as shading that depends on the angle of the surface. To optimize performance, avoid complex normal-based calculations unless essential for your shader.blender node geometry normal node setupgeometry normal cyclesgeometry normal eevee
Geometry TangentThis node setup uses the Tangent output from the Geometry node, connected to an Emission shader, to create effects based on surface tangents. This can be useful for effects like anisotropic shading. Ensure that tangent-based effects are necessary to avoid unnecessary calculations, and simplify the shader if possible for better performance.blender node geometry tangent node setupgeometry tangent cyclesgeometry tangent eevee
Geometry True NormalThe True Normal output from the Geometry node is used here to drive an Emission shader. This provides the true surface normal of the geometry, which can be useful for accurate shading effects. Optimize performance by using the True Normal node only when precise normal data is required, and minimize additional computations involving these normals.blender node geometry true normal node setupgeometry true normal cyclesgeometry true normal eevee
Geometry IncomingThis setup uses the Incoming vector from the Geometry node, connected to an Emission shader, to create effects based on the incoming light direction. This can be useful for shaders that need to react to light direction. For performance, limit the complexity of calculations involving the incoming vector and use this node only when necessary for the shader’s effect.blender node geometry incoming node setupgeometry incoming cyclesgeometry incoming eevee
Geometry ParametricIn this setup, the Parametric output from the Geometry node is connected to an Emission shader. This allows you to create effects based on the parametric coordinates of the surface. Optimize performance by simplifying calculations that use parametric data and applying this effect only where needed.blender node geometry parametric node setupgeometry parametric cyclesgeometry parametric eevee
Geometry BackfacingThis node setup uses the Backfacing output from the Geometry node to control an Emission shader, which can be used to differentiate between the front and back faces of geometry. This is helpful for effects like backface culling or special shading on the back faces. For performance, use this node selectively and ensure its effect is necessary for your scene.blender node geometry backfacing node setupgeometry backfacing cyclesgeometry backfacing eevee
Geometry PointinessThe Pointiness output from the Geometry node in this setup is connected to an Emission shader. This node can highlight edges and concave areas of the geometry, useful for effects like dirt or wear. For better performance, use the Pointiness node only when such edge effects are needed and minimize additional processing on the pointiness data.blender node geometry pointiness node setupgeometry pointiness cyclesgeometry pointiness eevee
Geometry Random Per IslandThis setup uses the Random Per Island output from the Geometry node to drive an Emission shader. This node assigns a random value to each disconnected part of the mesh, useful for creating varied effects on different mesh parts. To optimize, use this node for specific effects where the randomness per island is critical and avoid unnecessary calculations on this output.blender node geometry random per island node setupgeometry random per island cyclesgeometry random per island eevee
Layer Weight FresnelThe Layer Weight node is used here with its Fresnel output connected to an Emission shader, which can be used to create effects that change with the viewing angle. Adjust the Blend value to control the transition. For performance, fine-tune the Blend value to balance between desired visual effects and computational load.blender node layer weight fresnel node setuplayer weight fresnel cycleslayer weight fresnel eevee
Layer Weight FacingThis node setup uses the Layer Weight node with its Facing output connected to an Emission shader. This can create effects that vary based on the angle between the surface normal and the view direction. Adjust the Blend value for different facing effects. To optimize performance, use this node sparingly and simplify shaders where possible.blender node layer weight facing node setuplayer weight facing cycleslayer weight facing eevee
Lightpath Is Camera RayThe Light Path node with its Is Camera Ray output is used here to control a Mix Shader, blending between different shaders based on whether the ray is a camera ray. This setup can create different effects for camera-visible and non-visible rays, useful for transparency or special rendering effects. To improve performance, ensure the mix is necessary for your scene and keep shaders simple.blender node lightpath is camera ray node setuplightpath is camera ray cycleslightpath is camera ray eevee
Lightpath Is Shadow RayThis setup uses the Is Shadow Ray output from the Light Path node to influence a Mix Shader, creating different effects based on whether a ray is a shadow ray. This can be used to control how shadows are rendered or to add special effects to shadows. For performance, use this selectively and simplify shaders to avoid slow renders.blender node lightpath is shadow ray node setuplightpath is shadow ray cycleslightpath is shadow ray eevee
Lightpath Is Diffuse RayIn this node setup, the Is Diffuse Ray output from the Light Path node is connected to a Mix Shader, allowing different shaders for diffuse rays. This is useful for creating distinct effects for diffuse lighting. To optimize performance, use this node for specific diffuse effects and simplify the mix shader setup to avoid complex calculations.blender node lightpath is diffuse ray node setuplightpath is diffuse ray cycleslightpath is diffuse ray eevee
Lightpath Is Glossy RayThis setup uses the Is Glossy Ray output from the Light Path node to control a Mix Shader, blending shaders based on whether the ray is glossy. This can create distinct effects for glossy reflections. Adjust the shader inputs to fine-tune the glossy effect. For performance, limit the complexity of glossy effects and simplify the shaders where possible.blender node lightpath is glossy ray node setuplightpath is glossy ray cycleslightpath is glossy ray eevee
Lightpath Is Singular RayThis setup uses the Is Singular Ray output from the Light Path node to control a Mix Shader, blending between a Principled BSDF and an Emission shader. This is helpful for creating different effects for singular rays, often used in caustics or sharp reflections. Optimize performance by ensuring the Emission shader’s use is justified and keeping shader complexity low.blender node lightpath is singular ray node setuplightpath is singular ray cycleslightpath is singular ray eevee
Lightpath Is Reflection RayIn this node setup, the Is Reflection Ray output from the Light Path node is used to mix between different shaders based on whether the ray is a reflection. This can create varied effects for reflections. Adjust the inputs to the Mix Shader for the desired reflection behavior. To improve performance, avoid overly complex shader operations on reflection rays.blender node lightpath is reflection ray node setuplightpath is reflection ray cycleslightpath is reflection ray eevee
Lightpath Is Transmission RayThis setup uses the Is Transmission Ray output from the Light Path node to blend shaders, allowing different behavior for transmission rays. It is useful for managing how light passes through transparent surfaces. Optimize by simplifying the shaders used for transmission effects and reducing unnecessary computations.blender node lightpath is transmission ray node setuplightpath is transmission ray cycleslightpath is transmission ray eevee
Lightpath RaylengthThe Ray Length output from the Light Path node is used here with a Greater Than node to mix shaders based on the length of the ray. This can be useful for creating distance-based shading effects. Adjust the threshold and multiplier to control the effect. For performance, ensure the ray length check is essential and minimize additional processing based on this value.blender node lightpath raylength node setuplightpath raylength cycleslightpath raylength eevee
Lightpath Ray DepthThis node setup uses the Ray Depth output from the Light Path node to control shader mixing based on the depth of the ray. It can differentiate between shallow and deep rays, useful for effects like depth-based transparency. To optimize, use a sensible depth threshold and avoid complex shader operations that depend on ray depth.blender node lightpath ray depth node setuplightpath ray depth cycleslightpath ray depth eevee
Lightpath Diffuse DepthIn this setup, the Diffuse Depth output from the Light Path node is used to control a Mix Shader, creating different effects based on the diffuse depth. This is useful for managing how many diffuse bounces are considered in shading. Optimize by setting a reasonable depth limit and simplifying the shader operations based on this depth.blender node lightpath diffuse depth node setuplightpath diffuse depth cycleslightpath diffuse depth eevee
Lightpath Glossy DepthThis node setup uses the Glossy Depth output from the Light Path node to blend shaders based on the number of glossy bounces. It helps in controlling how light is reflected multiple times. For better performance, keep the glossy depth threshold within reasonable limits and avoid complex shader calculations that depend on high glossy depths.blender node lightpath glossy depth node setuplightpath glossy depth cycleslightpath glossy depth eevee
Lightpath Transparent DepthThe Transparent Depth output from the Light Path node is used here to mix shaders based on the depth of transparent bounces. This is useful for controlling how light interacts with multiple layers of transparency. Optimize by setting a practical depth threshold and reducing shader complexity for transparent depth calculations.blender node lightpath transparent depth node setuplightpath transparent depth cycleslightpath transparent depth eevee
Lightpath Transmission DepthThis node setup uses the Light Path node’s Transmission Depth output to control a Mix Shader. It blends between a Translucent BSDF and a Holdout shader based on the transmission depth, useful for managing transparency effects. To optimize performance, adjust the threshold in the Greater Than node to balance between desired transmission effects and rendering time.blender node lightpath transmission depth node setuplightpath transmission depth cycleslightpath transmission depth eevee
Object Info LocationThis node setup connects the Location output from the Object Info node to an Emission shader, allowing effects based on the object’s position. This is useful for position-based shading or effects that change with object movement. Optimize performance by using this node only when necessary and minimizing operations based on object location.blender node object info location node setupobject info location cyclesobject info location eevee
Object Info ColorIn this setup, the Color output from the Object Info node is connected to an Emission shader, enabling shading based on the object’s color attribute. This is useful for color-driven effects or to visualize different object attributes. For better performance, use the Object Info Color node only when the color information is essential for the shader’s effect.blender node object info color node setupobject info color cyclesobject info color eevee
Object Info AlphaThis node setup uses the Alpha output from the Object Info node to control an Emission shader. This can be applied for effects that depend on the object’s alpha transparency. To optimize, ensure the alpha-based effect is required and keep additional shader operations simple to avoid unnecessary rendering costs.blender node object info alpha node setupobject info alpha cyclesobject info alpha eevee
Object Info IndexThe Object Index output from the Object Info node is connected to an Emission shader in this setup, allowing effects based on the object’s index. This can be used for differentiating objects in a scene. Optimize performance by using the Object Index selectively and avoiding complex shader operations that depend on the object index.blender node object info index node setupobject info index cyclesobject info index eevee
Object Info Material IndexIn this setup, the Material Index output from the Object Info node is connected to an Emission shader. This allows you to create effects based on the material index of the object, useful for varying shading by material type. To improve performance, use this node only when material index differentiation is necessary and keep shader complexity low.blender node object info material index node setupobject info material index cyclesobject info material index eevee
Object Info RandomThis setup uses the Random output from the Object Info node to drive an Emission shader, creating random variations per object. This is useful for adding procedural randomness to shading. Optimize by limiting the complexity of operations that use the random value to maintain performance.blender node object info random node setupobject info random cyclesobject info random eevee
Particle Info IndexThe Index output from the Particle Info node is used here, mapped through a Map Range node, and connected to an Emission shader. This setup is ideal for effects that change based on the particle index. For performance, set the map range appropriately and minimize additional calculations on the index value.blender node particle info index node setupparticle info index cyclesparticle info index eevee
Particle Info RandomThis node setup connects the Random output from the Particle Info node to an Emission shader, introducing random variations per particle. This is useful for creating unique effects or procedural randomness in particle systems. Optimize performance by simplifying operations that depend on the random value and using it only where necessary.blender node particle info random node setupparticle info random cyclesparticle info random eevee
Particle Info AgeIn this setup, the Age output from the Particle Info node is connected to an Emission shader, enabling effects that change based on the particle’s age. This can be used for aging effects or varying particle properties over time. For better performance, use the Age attribute sparingly and keep shader operations simple and efficient.blender node particle info age node setupparticle info age cyclesparticle info age eevee
Particle Info LifetimeThis setup uses the Lifetime output from the Particle Info node to drive an Emission shader, useful for creating effects based on the particle’s lifetime. This can be applied for varying color or intensity as particles age. To optimize performance, ensure that the use of the Lifetime attribute is necessary for the visual effect and keep shader operations simple.blender node particle info lifetime node setupparticle info lifetime cyclesparticle info lifetime eevee
Particle Info LocationThe Particle Info node’s Location output is connected to an Emission shader in this setup. This allows shading effects based on the particle’s position, which is useful for position-based variations in particle systems. Optimize performance by simplifying shader operations that depend on particle location and using it only when required.blender node particle info location node setupparticle info location cyclesparticle info location eevee
Particle Info SizeThis node setup connects the Size output from the Particle Info node to an Emission shader. It can drive effects based on the particle size, which is helpful for creating size-dependent variations. For better performance, use the particle size information only where it significantly enhances the effect and keep the shader operations efficient.blender node particle info size node setupparticle info size cyclesparticle info size eevee
Particle Info VelocityIn this setup, the Velocity output from the Particle Info node is used to control an Emission shader. This is useful for effects that change with particle velocity, such as motion blur or speed-based color changes. To optimize, ensure velocity-driven effects are essential and minimize additional computations based on velocity.blender node particle info velocity node setupparticle info velocity cyclesparticle info velocity eevee
Particle Info Angular VelocityThis setup connects the Angular Velocity output from the Particle Info node to an Emission shader, creating effects based on the particle’s rotational speed. This is useful for dynamic effects that respond to angular motion. Optimize performance by limiting the use of angular velocity-driven effects to scenarios where they significantly impact the visual result.blender node particle info angular velocity node setupparticle info angular velocity cyclesparticle info angular velocity eevee
Point Info PositionThe Position output from the Point Info node is connected to an Emission shader in this setup. It drives shading based on point position, useful for position-dependent effects in point clouds or particles. To improve performance, use the position data sparingly and keep shader calculations based on position minimal.blender node point info position node setuppoint info position cyclespoint info position eevee
Point Info RadiusThis node setup uses the Radius output from the Point Info node to control an Emission shader, creating effects based on the radius of points. This is ideal for varying shading based on point size in point cloud data. For performance optimization, ensure radius-based effects are necessary and avoid complex operations driven by the radius value.blender node point info radius node setuppoint info radius cyclespoint info radius eevee
Point Info RandomIn this setup, the Random output from the Point Info node is used to drive an Emission shader, introducing random variations in point shading. This is useful for adding procedural randomness to point-based data. Optimize by simplifying operations that use the random value and using it only when randomness significantly enhances the effect.blender node point info random node setuppoint info random cyclespoint info random eevee
RgbThe RGB node is connected directly to an Emission shader in this setup. It provides a constant color value for the shader, useful for simple color assignments or as a base color for further operations. To maintain performance, use the RGB node for straightforward color assignments and avoid unnecessary complexity in the shader.blender node rgb node setuprgb cyclesrgb eevee
Tangent RadialThis setup uses the Tangent node set to Radial, connected to an Emission shader. It utilizes radial tangents based on the chosen axis (X, Y, or Z), useful for effects that depend on the surface’s radial orientation. To optimize performance, ensure radial tangents are essential for the effect and simplify the shader operations using these tangents.blender node tangent radial node setuptangent radial cyclestangent radial eevee
Tangent Uv MapThis setup uses the Tangent node set to UV Map, connecting it to an Emission shader. It utilizes the UV Map tangents to drive the shader, useful for effects that depend on the surface orientation. To optimize performance, ensure that UV mapping is properly set up and use tangents only when necessary to avoid additional computation.blender node tangent uv map node setuptangent uv map cyclestangent uv map eevee
Texture Coordinate GeneratedThis setup uses the ‘Generated’ output from the Texture Coordinate node connected to an Emission shader. It automatically adjusts the texture to the object’s geometry, making it ideal for procedural textures without the need for UV mapping. For better performance, use this for smooth, continuous surfaces where the texture should follow the shape dynamically.blender node texture coordinate generated node setuptexture coordinate generated cyclestexture coordinate generated eevee
Texture Coordinate NormalIn this setup, the ‘Normal’ output from the Texture Coordinate node is connected to the Emission shader. This configuration is beneficial for effects dependent on surface normals, like normal mapping or fake lighting. To optimize performance, utilize normal-based texturing for effects that don’t require detailed surface displacement.blender node texture coordinate normal node setuptexture coordinate normal cyclestexture coordinate normal eevee
Texture Coordinate UvThis setup employs the ‘UV’ output of the Texture Coordinate node linked to the Emission shader, using the object’s UV map for precise texture application. This is crucial for detailed and aligned texturing. To enhance performance, ensure your UV maps are clean and organized to minimize rendering overhead.blender node texture coordinate uv node setuptexture coordinate uv cyclestexture coordinate uv eevee
Texture Coordinate ObjectThis node setup uses the Texture Coordinate node to map different types of coordinates (such as Generated, Normal, UV, etc.) to drive the color of an Emission Shader. This can be particularly useful for procedural texturing where you need different mapping strategies. Tip: Use the ‘Object’ output for mapping textures consistently to objects regardless of their transformations. This setup is great for aligning textures on complex objects without needing to UV unwrap them.blender node texture coordinate object node setuptexture coordinate object cyclestexture coordinate object eevee
Texture Coordinate CameraThe ‘Camera’ output from the Texture Coordinate node is connected to the Emission shader in this setup, projecting the texture from the camera’s perspective. This is ideal for camera mapping and decals that remain static relative to the camera view. For optimal performance, use camera coordinates for static or planar projections in screen-space effects.blender node texture coordinate camera node setuptexture coordinate camera cyclestexture coordinate camera eevee
Texture Coordinate WindowThis node setup uses the ‘Window’ output of the Texture Coordinate node with an Emission shader, projecting the texture relative to the viewport coordinates. It’s effective for planar projections or screen-space effects. To maintain performance, apply window coordinates for simple screen-aligned textures and avoid overusing it for complex mappings.blender node texture coordinate window node setuptexture coordinate window cyclestexture coordinate window eevee
Texture Coordinate ReflectionThis node configuration leverages the ‘Reflection’ output from the Texture Coordinate node to generate reflection-based coordinates. These coordinates are particularly useful for creating realistic reflective surfaces by mapping textures or applying spherical harmonics in reflection space. The Emission Shader in this setup helps visualize how these coordinates affect the material by emitting light based on the reflection data. Tip: Use the ‘Reflection’ output for scenarios where you need to map textures or apply spherical harmonics to capture and reflect the environment accurately. This method is highly effective for materials that need to mirror their surroundings, such as metals or reflective water surfaces, providing a simplified yet powerful way to achieve realistic reflections.blender node texture coordinate reflection node setuptexture coordinate reflection cyclestexture coordinate reflection eevee
Uv MapHere, the ‘UV Map’ node is connected to the Emission shader using a specified UV map. This allows for accurate texture placement based on the UV layout, essential for detailed texturing. For better performance, use UV mapping for precise texture alignment and ensure the UV layout is optimized to reduce computational load.blender node uv map node setupuv map cyclesuv map eevee
Volume Info ColorThis configuration links the ‘Color’ output from the Volume Info node to the Emission shader, influencing the volume’s color rendering based on its information. It’s useful for creating volumetric effects like fog or colored smoke. To optimize performance, manage the complexity of your volumetric textures and adjust the color detail only where necessary.blender node volume info color node setupvolume info color cyclesvolume info color eevee
Volume Info DensityIn this setup, the ‘Density’ output from the Volume Info node connects to the Emission shader, controlling the intensity of the volume effect. This is useful for simulating volumetric lighting or dense atmospheric effects. For performance optimization, regulate the density settings to avoid excessive computational demand while achieving the desired visual effect.blender node volume info density node setupvolume info density cyclesvolume info density eevee
Volume Info FlameThis node setup connects the ‘Flame’ output from the Volume Info node to an Emission shader, driving the color of the flame effect. Additionally, an Attribute node with the ‘flames’ attribute is used for geometry-based adjustments. For better performance, balance the flame detail and the use of attributes to achieve realistic results without overwhelming computational resources.blender node volume info flame node setupvolume info flame cyclesvolume info flame eevee
Volume Info TemperatureThis setup uses the ‘Temperature’ output from the Volume Info node connected to the Emission shader, affecting how the temperature influences the color and intensity of the volume. Ideal for effects like fire or hot gases. For optimal performance, fine-tune the temperature settings to control the visual intensity without adding unnecessary computation.blender node volume info temperature node setupvolume info temperature cyclesvolume info temperature eevee
GammaThe Gamma node in this setup adjusts the gamma correction of a texture connected to the Emission shader. This is useful for fine-tuning the brightness and contrast of textures. For improved performance, use gamma adjustments sparingly and combine them with other color correction techniques to minimize processing time.blender node gamma node setupgamma cyclesgamma eevee
Hue Saturation ValueThis setup uses the Hue/Saturation/Value node to modify the color properties of a texture before connecting it to the Emission shader. It allows for dynamic changes to the hue, saturation, and value of the texture. For better performance, use these adjustments efficiently to avoid unnecessary recalculations of the texture’s color properties.blender node hue saturation value node setuphue saturation value cycleshue saturation value eevee
InvertIn this configuration, the Invert node reverses the colors of a texture before it is connected to the Emission shader. This is useful for creating negative or contrasting effects. To optimize performance, apply the Invert node judiciously, particularly in cases where strong color contrast is needed, to avoid extra computational steps.blender node invert node setupinvert cyclesinvert eevee
MixThis setup uses a Mix node to blend two colors together before passing the result to the Emission shader. It provides flexibility in combining different textures or colors. For enhanced performance, use the Mix node to blend textures in a balanced way, avoiding overly complex blending operations that can slow down rendering.blender node mix node setupmix cyclesmix eevee
Mix DarkenThe Mix Darken node in this setup blends textures by taking the darker values between them, and then connects the result to the Emission shader. This is effective for darkening effects and shadow creation. For optimal performance, apply the Darken mode in scenarios where subtle shading adjustments are required, minimizing the complexity of the blend.blender node mix darken node setupmix darken cyclesmix darken eevee
Mix MultiplyThis node setup uses a Mix node in Multiply mode to blend two textures, enhancing the darkness based on the factor. It is connected to the Emission shader and is useful for adding depth and shadows. To maintain performance, use Multiply mode for simple and effective shadow enhancements, avoiding overuse that could increase rendering time.blender node mix multiply node setupmix multiply cyclesmix multiply eevee
Mix Color BurnIn this setup, a Mix node in Color Burn mode blends textures, intensifying the darker regions and creating high-contrast effects, then connects to the Emission shader. This mode is ideal for dramatic lighting and effects. For better performance, utilize Color Burn selectively to avoid heavy processing, especially in scenes with multiple high-contrast elements.blender node mix color burn node setupmix color burn cyclesmix color burn eevee
Mix LightenIn this node setup, a Mix node in Lighten mode blends textures by selecting the lighter values between them, which is then fed into the Emission shader. This method is useful for highlighting or combining bright areas in textures. To maintain performance, apply the Lighten mode in scenes requiring minimal shading calculations to keep the rendering process efficient.blender node mix lighten node setupmix lighten cyclesmix lighten eevee
Mix ScreenThe Mix node in Screen mode combines textures to produce a lighter effect, similar to a photographic screen blend, before linking to the Emission shader. This technique is great for adding glow or light effects. For better performance, use Screen mode sparingly on textures that need enhanced brightness without significantly increasing render times.blender node mix screen node setupmix screen cyclesmix screen eevee
Mix AddThis setup utilizes a Mix node in Add mode to combine two textures, increasing the overall brightness, which is then connected to the Emission shader. Add mode is effective for brightening effects and combining luminous elements. To optimize performance, use Add mode for straightforward brightening tasks to avoid overly complex blending operations that could slow down rendering.blender node mix add node setupmix add cyclesmix add eevee
Mix OverlayThe Overlay mode in the Mix node blends textures to enhance contrast and combine details, then connects to the Emission shader. This is useful for textures that need a combination of shadows and highlights. For performance efficiency, apply Overlay mode for mid-tone adjustments where detail enhancement is needed without extensive computational load.blender node mix overlay node setupmix overlay cyclesmix overlay eevee
Mix Soft LightIn this setup, a Mix node in Soft Light mode combines textures to create a gentle, diffused lighting effect, which is then connected to the Emission shader. This method is ideal for softening textures or adding subtle lighting effects. For better performance, use Soft Light mode in moderation to avoid high computational demands while achieving a smooth lighting transition.blender node mix soft light node setupmix soft light cyclesmix soft light eevee
Mix Linear LightThis node configuration employs a Mix node in Linear Light mode to blend textures by adjusting the brightness and contrast, before connecting to the Emission shader. This is effective for intense light effects and contrast adjustments. To maintain performance, utilize Linear Light mode for impactful lighting and avoid overuse in scenes with complex lighting to keep rendering times manageable.blender node mix linear light node setupmix linear light cyclesmix linear light eevee
Mix DifferenceThe Difference mode in this Mix node setup blends textures by subtracting one from the other, resulting in a high-contrast effect, then connects to the Emission shader. This technique is useful for creating inversion effects or emphasizing differences between textures. For optimal performance, apply Difference mode for specific effects where high contrast is needed, and avoid using it excessively to minimize rendering overhead.blender node mix difference node setupmix difference cyclesmix difference eevee
Mix ExclusionThis setup uses a Mix node in Exclusion mode to blend two textures before connecting to the Emission shader. The Exclusion mode creates an effect similar to subtracting the blend but results in a more subtle and less harsh outcome than Difference mode. For optimal performance, use Exclusion mode for delicate blending to avoid adding excessive computation for complex subtractions.blender node mix exclusion node setupmix exclusion cyclesmix exclusion eevee
Mix SubtractIn this configuration, a Mix node in Subtract mode blends two textures by subtracting the values of one from the other before passing it to the Emission shader. This mode is effective for creating negative space and darkening effects. To maintain performance, use Subtract mode for simple subtraction tasks to avoid additional computation from complex subtractions.blender node mix subtract node setupmix subtract cyclesmix subtract eevee
Mix DivideThis setup employs a Mix node in Divide mode to blend two textures by dividing the values of one by the other, then connects the result to the Emission shader. This is useful for effects where a division of color values is needed, such as creating light-to-dark gradients. For better performance, use Divide mode for straightforward division operations, reducing the need for intricate blending calculations.blender node mix divide node setupmix divide cyclesmix divide eevee
Mix HueThe Mix node in Hue mode blends two textures by adjusting their hue, which is then linked to the Emission shader. This method is ideal for changing the color tones without altering the saturation or brightness. To optimize performance, use Hue adjustments sparingly and only when necessary to avoid extensive recalculations of color properties.blender node mix hue node setupmix hue cyclesmix hue eevee
Mix SaturationThis setup utilizes a Mix node in Saturation mode to combine textures by adjusting their saturation before connecting to the Emission shader. This is effective for enhancing or reducing color intensity. For enhanced performance, apply Saturation adjustments selectively to maintain the balance between vivid and muted colors without adding unnecessary computational load.blender node mix saturation node setupmix saturation cyclesmix saturation eevee
Mix ColorIn this configuration, the Mix node in Color mode blends textures by mixing their color values without affecting the luminance, then passes the result to the Emission shader. This is useful for color blending and tinting effects. For performance efficiency, use Color mode for simple color adjustments to keep rendering processes streamlined.blender node mix color node setupmix color cyclesmix color eevee
Mix ValueThe Mix node in Value mode combines textures by adjusting their brightness values before feeding them into the Emission shader. This mode is beneficial for brightness and contrast adjustments. To maintain performance, apply Value mode for direct adjustments to brightness to avoid complex calculations for light and dark areas.blender node mix value node setupmix value cyclesmix value eevee
Rgb CurvesThis node setup uses an RGB Curves node to adjust the color curves of a texture, providing precise control over the red, green, and blue channels, then connects it to the Emission shader. This method is great for detailed color grading. For better performance, use RGB Curves for fine-tuning color balance and avoid overcomplicating the curve adjustments to keep rendering times reasonable.blender node rgb curves node setuprgb curves cyclesrgb curves eevee
BlackbodyThe Blackbody node in this setup calculates the color based on temperature input, which is connected to the Emission shader. This is ideal for simulating natural light sources like stars or heated metal. For optimal performance, use Blackbody for accurate temperature-based color simulations and adjust the input values to match realistic scenarios, reducing unnecessary computation.blender node blackbody node setupblackbody cyclesblackbody eevee
ClampThis configuration uses a Clamp node to limit the values of a texture to a specified range before connecting to the Emission shader. It is effective for controlling the minimum and maximum outputs of texture values. For performance optimization, use the Clamp node to prevent out-of-bound values and reduce the need for excessive recalculations in shading.blender node clamp node setupclamp cyclesclamp eevee
Color Ramp Rgb LinearThis setup uses a Color Ramp node to map colors from an input texture to a specific color gradient, which is then connected to the Emission shader. This allows for precise control over the color transitions in the texture. For optimal performance, use Color Ramp to streamline color adjustments and avoid complex manual color corrections.blender node color ramp rgb linear node setupcolor ramp rgb linear cyclescolor ramp rgb linear eevee
Color Ramp Rgb B SplineIn this setup, a Color Ramp node with ‘RGB B-Spline’ interpolation is used to create a smooth, spline-based gradient across the texture, then linked to an Emission shader. This mode is ideal for generating soft and fluid color transitions. To maintain performance, apply ‘B-Spline’ interpolation in scenarios requiring gentle gradients, avoiding overuse in detailed textures to prevent increased rendering times.blender node color ramp rgb b spline node setupcolor ramp rgb b spline cyclescolor ramp rgb b spline eevee
Color Ramp Rgb ConstantThis node configuration utilizes a Color Ramp set to ‘RGB Constant’ interpolation, which creates sharp, discrete color transitions between stops on the ramp, connected to an Emission shader. This is effective for achieving a step-like color effect. For better performance, use ‘Constant’ interpolation for clear-cut color delineations and avoid in areas needing smooth gradients to keep computational demands low.blender node color ramp rgb constant node setupcolor ramp rgb constant cyclescolor ramp rgb constant eevee
Color Ramp Rgb EaseThe setup features a Color Ramp node set to ‘RGB Ease’ interpolation, which applies an easing function to create smooth, ease-in and ease-out transitions in the color gradient, connected to the Emission shader. This mode is useful for soft and gradual color changes. For performance efficiency, use ‘Ease’ interpolation for smooth transitions while minimizing the complexity of the gradient.blender node color ramp rgb ease node setupcolor ramp rgb ease cyclescolor ramp rgb ease eevee
Color Ramp Rgb CardinalThis configuration uses a Color Ramp node with ‘RGB Cardinal’ interpolation to generate color gradients based on a cardinal spline, offering smooth and flowing transitions, then connected to an Emission shader. This is great for creating natural and continuous color flows. To optimize performance, apply ‘Cardinal’ interpolation in textures where organic and flowing gradients are needed without overcomplicating the rendering process.blender node color ramp rgb cardinal node setupcolor ramp rgb cardinal cyclescolor ramp rgb cardinal eevee
Color Ramp Hsv NearIn this setup, a Color Ramp node set to ‘HSV Near’ interpolation is used to map the input texture through a gradient based on the HSV color model, blending hues closely along the ramp, connected to an Emission shader. This is ideal for maintaining hue consistency in transitions. For better performance, use ‘HSV Near’ for precise hue blending, keeping adjustments straightforward to avoid excessive computation.blender node color ramp hsv near node setupcolor ramp hsv near cyclescolor ramp hsv near eevee
Color Ramp Hsv FarThis setup uses a Color Ramp node set to ‘HSV Far’ interpolation, which maps the texture through a gradient where hues blend over the maximum distance in the HSV color wheel, then linked to an Emission shader. This mode is suitable for creating distinct color changes. For enhanced performance, apply ‘HSV Far’ for strong color contrasts and distinct hue separations while minimizing gradient complexity.blender node color ramp hsv far node setupcolor ramp hsv far cyclescolor ramp hsv far eevee
Color Ramp Hsv ClockwiseThe configuration features a Color Ramp node set to ‘HSV Clockwise’ interpolation, blending hues in a clockwise direction on the HSV color wheel, connected to an Emission shader. This is useful for creating specific directional color shifts. For optimal performance, use ‘HSV Clockwise’ for intentional color rotations and avoid overuse in general blending to keep the rendering process efficient.blender node color ramp hsv clockwise node setupcolor ramp hsv clockwise cyclescolor ramp hsv clockwise eevee
Color Ramp Hsv Counter ClockwiseThis node setup utilizes a Color Ramp node with ‘HSV Counter-Clockwise’ interpolation, blending hues in a counter-clockwise direction on the HSV color wheel, then connected to an Emission shader. This is ideal for specific counter-clockwise color transitions. For better performance, use ‘HSV Counter-Clockwise’ for targeted color adjustments and avoid unnecessary complexity in the gradient to reduce rendering times.blender node color ramp hsv counter clockwise node setupcolor ramp hsv counter clockwise cyclescolor ramp hsv counter clockwise eevee
Color Ramp Hsl NearThis setup uses a Color Ramp node set to ‘HSL Near’ interpolation, which maps the input texture through a color gradient based on the HSL color model and blends colors closely along the ramp. This is connected to an Emission shader. For optimal performance, use ‘HSL Near’ for smooth transitions in the hue, saturation, and lightness of the texture to achieve a natural gradient effect without adding complexity to the color mapping process.blender node color ramp hsl near node setupcolor ramp hsl near cyclescolor ramp hsl near eevee
Color Ramp Hsl FarIn this setup, a Color Ramp node with ‘HSL Far’ interpolation is used to map an input texture through a gradient based on the HSL color model with hues blending over the maximum distance. This setup is connected to an Emission shader. Use ‘HSL Far’ when you need distinct color transitions across the hue spectrum. For optimal performance, balance the complexity of the color transitions with rendering needs to avoid high computational costs.blender node color ramp hsl far node setupcolor ramp hsl far cyclescolor ramp hsl far eevee
Color Ramp Hsl ClockwiseThis node configuration employs a Color Ramp node set to ‘HSL Clockwise’ interpolation, which blends hues in a clockwise direction on the HSL color wheel. The ramp is then connected to an Emission shader. This method is beneficial for creating specific directional color shifts. To maintain performance, use ‘HSL Clockwise’ for targeted color adjustments and limit its use to areas where this directional blending is necessary.blender node color ramp hsl clockwise node setupcolor ramp hsl clockwise cyclescolor ramp hsl clockwise eevee
Color Ramp Hsl Counter ClockwiseThis setup utilizes a Color Ramp node set to ‘HSL Counter-Clockwise’ interpolation, blending hues in a counter-clockwise direction on the HSL color wheel. This is connected to an Emission shader. This technique is useful for creating counter-clockwise color transitions. For performance, use ‘HSL Counter-Clockwise’ judiciously, focusing on cases where specific color directionality is required to avoid adding unnecessary complexity.blender node color ramp hsl counter clockwise node setupcolor ramp hsl counter clockwise cyclescolor ramp hsl counter clockwise eevee
Combine Color HsvIn this setup, the Combine Color node is set to ‘HSV’ mode, combining separate Hue, Saturation, and Value inputs into a single color output, which is then connected to an Emission shader. This is ideal for procedurally generating colors based on HSV components. For efficient performance, control the HSV inputs to keep calculations straightforward and avoid overly complex or dynamic input values.blender node combine color hsv node setupcombine color hsv cyclescombine color hsv eevee
Combine Color HslThis configuration uses a Combine Color node set to ‘HSL’ mode to combine separate Hue, Saturation, and Lightness inputs into a single color output, connected to an Emission shader. This setup is suitable for creating colors based on HSL components. For performance, manage the HSL inputs to ensure they remain simple and avoid rapid changes, which can lead to increased computational overhead.blender node combine color hsl node setupcombine color hsl cyclescombine color hsl eevee
Combine XyzThe node setup combines separate X, Y, and Z inputs using the Combine XYZ node, which is then linked to an Emission shader. This technique is effective for generating vectors from separate components. To optimize performance, keep the input values for X, Y, and Z consistent and avoid complex or rapidly changing inputs that can increase the load on the rendering process.blender node combine xyz node setupcombine xyz cyclescombine xyz eevee
Float CurveThis setup connects a texture’s value output to a Float Curve node, which modifies the input value using a custom curve. The result is then fed into an Emission shader. The Float Curve node is ideal for applying detailed control over value transformations. For performance, simplify the curve whenever possible to reduce the computational load and avoid excessive detail that can slow down rendering.blender node float curve node setupfloat curve cyclesfloat curve eevee
Map Range LinearIn this configuration, the Position output from the Geometry node is connected to a Noise Texture node. The output is then mapped using a Map Range node set to ‘Linear’ interpolation, which modifies the range of values linearly before being input into an Emission shader. To maintain performance, use linear mapping for straightforward value adjustments and avoid unnecessary complexity in the mapping process.blender node map range linear node setupmap range linear cyclesmap range linear eevee
Map Range Stepped LinearThis setup features a Noise Texture node connected to a Map Range node set to ‘Stepped Linear’ interpolation. The Map Range node maps the values from the Noise Texture to create a stepped gradient effect, which is then fed into an Emission shader. For better performance, use ‘Stepped Linear’ interpolation when discrete value steps are needed and adjust the step parameters to match the required detail without overcomplicating the gradient.blender node map range stepped linear node setupmap range stepped linear cyclesmap range stepped linear eevee
Map Range Smooth StepThis setup uses a Geometry node’s Position output connected to a Noise Texture node set to ‘3D’ and ‘Multifractal’ mode. The Noise Texture is then connected to a Map Range node set to ‘Smooth Step’ interpolation. The Map Range node modifies the range of values from the Noise Texture before being input into an Emission shader. For performance, ensure that the noise parameters are kept within reasonable limits to prevent excessive computations.blender node map range smooth step node setupmap range smooth step cyclesmap range smooth step eevee
Map Range Smoother StepThis setup uses the Map Range node with the ‘Smoother Step’ interpolation to generate a smooth gradient effect. The ‘Noise Texture’ node provides a fractal noise input. Tip: Using ‘Smoother Step’ helps in avoiding hard transitions in the gradient, which can be more pleasing for certain textures and reduce aliasing in animations.blender node map range smoother step node setupmap range smoother step cyclesmap range smoother step eevee
Math AddThis node configuration combines two image textures using a Math ‘Add’ node to influence the color output of an Emission shader. Tip: The ‘Add’ operation can increase the brightness, which is useful for creating effects like highlights or combining light maps.blender node math add node setupmath add cyclesmath add eevee
Math MultiplyIn this node setup, two image textures are multiplied together using a Math ‘Multiply’ node, and the result drives an Emission shader. Tip: Multiplying textures can effectively darken the image and is useful for creating effects where overlapping colors should combine their intensities, such as shadow masks or light patterns.blender node math multiply node setupmath multiply cyclesmath multiply eevee
Math DivideThis setup divides the values of two image textures using a Math ‘Divide’ node, and the result is used to color an Emission shader. Tip: Division can create high-contrast effects and is useful for normalization or when you need to create a difference effect between two textures.blender node math divide node setupmath divide cyclesmath divide eevee
Math Multiply AddThe Multiply Add node allows for a combination of multiplication and addition operations in a single step. Here, a geometry input is separated into XYZ components, and the ‘Multiply Add’ node is used to scale and shift these values before driving an Emission shader. Tip: This node is efficient for performing combined operations without requiring separate nodes, reducing complexity and potentially improving performance.blender node math multiply add node setupmath multiply add cyclesmath multiply add eevee
Math PowerThe Math ‘Power’ node raises the input values from an image texture to a specified exponent, and the result is connected to an Emission shader. Tip: Use the Power node to create exponential effects, such as emphasizing certain details or enhancing highlights. Be cautious with high exponents as they can create very bright outputs.blender node math power node setupmath power cyclesmath power eevee
Math LogarithmIn this setup, a Math ‘Logarithm’ node is used to modify the output of a height value before feeding it into a split screen node and then to an Emission shader. Tip: The logarithm function can be used to compress the dynamic range of values, making it useful for enhancing low-value details in textures or data visualizations.blender node math logarithm node setupmath logarithm cyclesmath logarithm eevee
Math Inverse Square RootThis node setup includes an ‘Inverse Square Root’ node applied to a multiplied height value, which then influences the emission color. Tip: Inverse square root is useful in physics simulations and lighting calculations where inverse attenuation or falloff is needed.blender node math inverse square root node setupmath inverse square root cyclesmath inverse square root eevee
Math AbsoluteThe ‘Absolute’ node takes the absolute value of the multiplied and adjusted height data before it affects the emission color. Tip: Absolute value is particularly useful for ensuring all values are positive, which can be important in cases where negative values would lead to undesired effects in the shader output.blender node math absolute node setupmath absolute cyclesmath absolute eevee
Math ExponentIn this setup, the Math ‘Exponent’ node raises the adjusted height values to a specified power, influencing the emission color. Tip: The ‘Exponent’ node can exaggerate or compress value ranges, useful for enhancing specific features or creating non-linear effects in textures.blender node math exponent node setupmath exponent cyclesmath exponent eevee
Math MinimumThis configuration uses the Math ‘Minimum’ node to determine the smaller value between two inputs, affecting the emission shader’s color. Tip: Use the ‘Minimum’ node to clamp values, ensuring that the output never exceeds a certain threshold, which can be useful in preventing overbright or washed-out areas in textures.blender node math minimum node setupmath minimum cyclesmath minimum eevee
Math MaximumThis setup employs the Math ‘Maximum’ node to find the larger value between two inputs and apply it to the emission shader. Tip: The ‘Maximum’ node can be used to ensure that a minimum brightness is always maintained, useful for preventing dark areas in a texture from becoming too dim.blender node math maximum node setupmath maximum cyclesmath maximum eevee
Math Less ThanThe ‘Less Than’ node checks if the input value is less than a specified threshold and outputs a corresponding emission color. Tip: ‘Less Than’ is useful for creating masks or selective effects based on value comparisons, such as highlighting areas below a certain brightness or elevation.blender node math less than node setupmath less than cyclesmath less than eevee
Math Greater ThanIn this setup, the ‘Greater Than’ node outputs an emission color if the input value exceeds a specified threshold. Tip: Use the ‘Greater Than’ node for threshold-based masking or highlighting, such as identifying regions above a certain intensity or height in textures.blender node math greater than node setupmath greater than cyclesmath greater than eevee
Math SignThis node configuration applies the ‘Sign’ function to input values, returning -1, 0, or 1 based on the input sign, and uses this to drive an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Sign’ node is useful for distinguishing between positive and negative values, which can be applied to create directional or sign-based effects in textures.blender node math sign node setupmath sign cyclesmath sign eevee
Math CompareThe ‘Compare’ node checks if two input values are close within a specified epsilon range and affects the emission color based on the result. Tip: Use the ‘Compare’ node for precise equality checks or creating effects that depend on values being similar, such as aligning patterns or features in textures.blender node math compare node setupmath compare cyclesmath compare eevee
Math Smooth MinimumThis setup uses the ‘Smooth Minimum’ node to blend between two values smoothly, applying the result to an emission shader. Tip: ‘Smooth Minimum’ is useful for soft blending between textures or values, creating gradual transitions that avoid hard edges.blender node math smooth minimum node setupmath smooth minimum cyclesmath smooth minimum eevee
Math Smooth MaximumIn this configuration, the ‘Smooth Maximum’ node is used to blend between two values smoothly and the output is used for an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Smooth Maximum’ node can create smooth transitions for maximum values, useful in softening the peaks or highlights in textures.blender node math smooth maximum node setupmath smooth maximum cyclesmath smooth maximum eevee
Math RoundThis node setup applies a ‘Round’ operation to a modified height value, then uses the result to drive an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Round’ node can create step-like gradients or discrete values, useful for pixelated or quantized effects. Use it to simplify values and reduce detail complexity in certain artistic shaders.blender node math round node setupmath round cyclesmath round eevee
Math FloorThis node setup utilizes a ‘Floor’ operation on a modified height value, using the result to influence an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Floor’ node always rounds numbers downwards to the nearest whole integer. This can be useful for creating step-like effects or for discretizing values, potentially optimizing performance in certain scenarios by simplifying calculations.blender node math floor node setupmath floor cyclesmath floor eevee
Math CeilThis configuration employs a ‘Ceil’ operation on an altered height value and connects the output to an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Ceil’ node always rounds numbers upwards to the nearest whole integer, offering a counterpart to the ‘Floor’ node. It’s handy for creating stepped gradients, simplifying values, and potentially boosting performance by reducing calculation complexity.blender node math ceil node setupmath ceil cyclesmath ceil eevee
Math TruncateThis setup utilizes a ‘Truncate’ operation on a modified height value and links the outcome to an emission shader. Tip: Similar to ‘Floor,’ the ‘Truncate’ node removes the decimal part of a number, effectively rounding towards zero. This can be useful for stylized effects or when precise decimal values are not required, potentially leading to performance gains in specific situations by simplifying calculations.blender node math truncate node setupmath truncate cyclesmath truncate eevee
Math FractionThis setup employs a ‘Fraction’ operation on a modified height value and connects the output to an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Fraction’ node isolates and returns only the decimal portion of a number, discarding the integer part. This is valuable for creating repeating patterns, smooth gradients, or effects that require only the fractional component of a value.blender node math fraction node setupmath fraction cyclesmath fraction eevee
Math Truncated ModuloThis setup applies a ‘Truncated Modulo’ operation to a modified height value and uses the result to drive an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Truncated Modulo’ node returns the remainder of a division operation. This makes it useful for creating repeating patterns, tiling textures, or effects that require cyclical values within a specific range.blender node math truncated modulo node setupmath truncated modulo cyclesmath truncated modulo eevee
Math Floored ModuloThis configuration utilizes a ‘Floored Modulo’ operation on a modified height value and connects the output to an emission shader. Tip: Like ‘Truncated Modulo,’ the ‘Floored Modulo’ node also returns the remainder of a division, but it handles negative inputs differently, potentially leading to smoother transitions or different pattern variations compared to ‘Truncated Modulo.’blender node math floored modulo node setupmath floored modulo cyclesmath floored modulo eevee
Math WrapThis node setup employs a ‘Wrap’ operation on a modified height value and links the result to an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Wrap’ node confines a value within a specified range, wrapping it around if it exceeds the boundaries. This is beneficial for creating seamless tiling textures, repeating patterns, or effects that require values to stay within a defined interval.blender node math wrap node setupmath wrap cyclesmath wrap eevee
Math SnapThis setup uses a ‘Snap’ operation on a modified height value and connects the output to an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Snap’ node rounds a value to the nearest multiple of an increment. This is useful for creating quantized effects, snapping objects to a grid, or achieving a more pixelated or blocky aesthetic in shaders.blender node math snap node setupmath snap cyclesmath snap eevee
Math Ping PongThis configuration applies a ‘Ping-Pong’ operation to a modified height value, then uses the result to drive an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Ping-Pong’ node mirrors a value back and forth within a specified range, creating a bouncing or oscillating effect. This is useful for animations, procedural motion, or generating cyclical patterns with smooth transitions.blender node math ping pong node setupmath ping pong cyclesmath ping pong eevee
Math SineThis node setup uses a ‘Sine’ operation to create a cyclical pattern based on height information. The output is used to control an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Sine’ node is great for generating smooth, repeating gradients or patterns, ideal for effects like waves, ripples, or pulsating lights.blender node math sine node setupmath sine cyclesmath sine eevee
Math CosineThis node setup uses a ‘Cosine’ operation to create a cyclical pattern based on height information. The output is used to control an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Cosine’ node, like the ‘Sine’ node, is excellent for generating smooth, repeating gradients or patterns but with a phase shift. This makes it suitable for effects like waves, ripples, or pulsating lights, but where you need the peak to start at a different point.blender node math cosine node setupmath cosine cyclesmath cosine eevee
Math TangentIn this setup, the ‘Tangent’ node calculates the tangent of the input values, driving an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Tangent’ function can be used to create periodic patterns or effects based on angular relationships in textures.blender node math tangent node setupmath tangent cyclesmath tangent eevee
Math ArcsineThis node setup uses the ‘Arcsine’ function to calculate the arcsine of the input values and applies the result to an emission shader. Tip: Use the ‘Arcsine’ function to generate effects based on inverse sine relationships, which can be useful for creating non-linear distortions or gradients.blender node math arcsine node setupmath arcsine cyclesmath arcsine eevee
Math ArccosineThe ‘Arccosine’ node computes the arccosine of the input values, influencing the emission shader. Tip: The ‘Arccosine’ function can create effects based on the inverse cosine, useful for generating radial patterns or adjusting values based on angular distance.blender node math arccosine node setupmath arccosine cyclesmath arccosine eevee
Math ArctangentThis configuration uses the ‘Arctangent’ node to calculate the arctangent of the input values, driving the emission shader. Tip: The ‘Arctangent’ function is helpful for creating effects that depend on the angular relationship of values, such as rotation-based distortions or gradients.blender node math arctangent node setupmath arctangent cyclesmath arctangent eevee
Math Arctan2The ‘Arctan2’ node calculates the arctangent of two input values and affects the emission shader’s color. Tip: ‘Arctan2’ is useful for generating effects based on the angle between two points, ideal for directional gradients or rotational effects in textures.blender node math arctan2 node setupmath arctan2 cyclesmath arctan2 eevee
Math Hyperbolic SineIn this setup, the ‘Hyperbolic Sine’ node computes the hyperbolic sine of the input values, influencing the emission shader. Tip: Use the ‘Hyperbolic Sine’ function for creating smooth, wave-like distortions or gradients in textures.blender node math hyperbolic sine node setupmath hyperbolic sine cyclesmath hyperbolic sine eevee
Math Hyperbolic CosineThis node configuration applies the ‘Hyperbolic Cosine’ function to input values, and the result is used to drive an emission shader. Tip: The ‘Hyperbolic Cosine’ function can be useful for generating smooth, exponential curves in textures or effects.blender node math hyperbolic cosine node setupmath hyperbolic cosine cyclesmath hyperbolic cosine eevee
Math Hyperbolic TangentThe ‘Hyperbolic Tangent’ node calculates the hyperbolic tangent of the input values, affecting the emission shader. Tip: The ‘Hyperbolic Tangent’ function is effective for creating smooth transitions or compressing value ranges in textures, useful for softening gradients or details.blender node math hyperbolic tangent node setupmath hyperbolic tangent cyclesmath hyperbolic tangent eevee
Convert MixThe ‘Mix’ node combines two values based on a factor to control the blending between them, affecting the emission shader. Tip: Enable ‘Clamp Factor’ to ensure the blended output stays within a valid range, preventing unexpected bright spots or clipping.blender node convert mix node setupconvert mix cyclesconvert mix eevee
Seperate Color RgbThis node setup uses the ‘Separate Color’ node in RGB mode to split the colors of an image into their red, green, and blue components. Each component can then be processed separately. Tip: Use the ‘Separate Color’ node to manipulate individual color channels, which is useful for color correction or channel-specific effects.blender node seperate color rgb node setupseperate color rgb cyclesseperate color rgb eevee
Seperate Color HsvThis configuration employs the ‘Separate Color’ node in HSV mode to decompose an image into its hue, saturation, and value components. This is useful for adjustments based on these attributes. Tip: The HSV mode is ideal for tasks requiring color manipulation based on hue or brightness, such as creating hue shifts or adjusting contrast.blender node seperate color hsv node setupseperate color hsv cyclesseperate color hsv eevee
Seperate Color HslIn this setup, the ‘Separate Color’ node is set to HSL mode to separate an image into hue, saturation, and lightness. Each component can be modified to achieve specific visual effects. Tip: The HSL mode is particularly useful for adjusting the lightness of an image without affecting its color saturation, ideal for fine-tuning shadows and highlights.blender node seperate color hsl node setupseperate color hsl cyclesseperate color hsl eevee
Seperate XyzThis node configuration uses the ‘Separate XYZ’ node to split a vector input into its X, Y, and Z components. Each component can then be processed individually. Tip: Use the ‘Separate XYZ’ node to manipulate individual spatial dimensions, which is essential for vector math operations or spatial transformations.blender node seperate xyz node setupseperate xyz cyclesseperate xyz eevee
Shader To RgbThis setup converts the shader output to an RGB color using the ‘Shader to RGB’ node, which is then adjusted with a ‘Color Ramp’ for further processing. Tip: The ‘Shader to RGB’ node is useful for converting non-color data into color space for further manipulation with color operations or visual adjustments.blender node shader to rgb node setupshader to rgb cyclesshader to rgb eevee
Vector Math Cross ProductThe ‘Cross Product’ node calculates the cross product of two vector inputs, which can be used to determine a vector perpendicular to the input vectors. This result is then connected to an Emission shader. Tip: Use the ‘Cross Product’ node in 3D modeling to find perpendicular vectors, essential for normal calculations and certain geometric transformations.blender node vector math cross product node setupvector math cross product cyclesvector math cross product eevee
Vector Math ProjectThis node setup projects one vector onto another using the ‘Project’ node, and the result is used to drive an Emission shader. Tip: The ‘Project’ node is helpful for projecting vectors onto planes or directions, which is useful in tasks like shadow calculations or aligning objects along a specific axis.blender node vector math project node setupvector math project cyclesvector math project eevee
Vector Math ReflectIn this configuration, the ‘Reflect’ node reflects a vector around a given normal vector and applies the result to an Emission shader. Tip: The ‘Reflect’ node is ideal for simulating reflections and mirror effects, particularly in shaders that need to calculate reflected light or surfaces.blender node vector math reflect node setupvector math reflect cyclesvector math reflect eevee
Vector Math RefractThis setup uses the ‘Refract’ node to calculate the refraction of a vector given a normal and an index of refraction (IOR), influencing the emission shader. Tip: The ‘Refract’ node is essential for creating realistic refraction effects in materials, especially for simulating the bending of light through transparent or semi-transparent surfaces.blender node vector math refract node setupvector math refract cyclesvector math refract eevee
Vector Math Dot ProductThe ‘Dot Product’ node calculates the dot product of two vectors, which is used to determine the angle or alignment between them, and this value is connected to an Emission shader. Tip: Use the ‘Dot Product’ node to calculate the cosine of the angle between vectors, useful in lighting calculations, shading, and determining alignment in animations.blender node vector math dot product node setupvector math dot product cyclesvector math dot product eevee
Vector Math DistanceThis setup calculates the distance between two vectors using the ‘Distance’ node. The resulting value is mapped using the ‘Map Range’ node and then drives the color of an Emission shader. Tip: The ‘Distance’ node is useful for calculating the Euclidean distance between points, which is ideal for creating radial gradients or distance-based effects in materials.blender node vector math distance node setupvector math distance cyclesvector math distance eevee
Vector Math LengthIn this configuration, the ‘Length’ node computes the length (magnitude) of a vector. The resulting length is mapped to a range using the ‘Map Range’ node and applied to an Emission shader. Tip: The ‘Length’ node is useful for normalizing vector values or creating effects based on the distance from a point, such as falloff gradients.blender node vector math length node setupvector math length cyclesvector math length eevee
Vector Math NormalizeThis node setup normalizes a vector input using the ‘Normalize’ node to ensure it has a unit length, and then drives an Emission shader. The ‘Multiply Add’ node is used to scale and shift the vector before normalization. Tip: Normalizing vectors is essential in lighting calculations and shading to maintain consistent lighting effects regardless of vector magnitude.blender node vector math normalize node setupvector math normalize cyclesvector math normalize eevee
WavelengthThis configuration maps the height input to a wavelength value using the ‘Map Range’ node and converts it to a color with the ‘Wavelength’ node. The color is then used in an Emission shader. Tip: The ‘Wavelength’ node can be used to create effects based on light wavelengths, such as simulating spectral colors or rainbow effects.blender node wavelength node setupwavelength cycleswavelength eevee
Add ShaderThis setup combines a Diffuse BSDF and a Glossy BSDF using an ‘Add Shader’ node, which then outputs to the Material Output. The inputs are driven by a height map processed through a ‘Color Ramp’ and ‘Separate XYZ’ nodes. Tip: Use the ‘Add Shader’ node to combine different shading effects. This is useful for materials that need both reflective and diffuse properties, like metals with a coating.blender node add shader node setupadd shader cyclesadd shader eevee
Diffuse BsdfIn this setup, a ‘Diffuse BSDF’ shader is used to create a matte surface. It is influenced by a color generated from a ‘Color Ramp’ driven by a height map. Tip: The ‘Diffuse BSDF’ is ideal for materials that scatter light evenly, such as paper or matte paint. Adjust the roughness parameter for different surface finishes.blender node diffuse bsdf node setupdiffuse bsdf cyclesdiffuse bsdf eevee
EmissionThis configuration uses an ‘Emission’ shader to give off light based on a color input from a ‘Color Ramp’ connected to a height map. Tip: The ‘Emission’ shader is perfect for materials that need to emit light, such as screens or glowing objects. Adjust the strength of the emission to control the intensity of the light.blender node emission node setupemission cyclesemission eevee
Glossy BsdfThis node setup uses a ‘Glossy BSDF’ shader to create a reflective surface. The shader is controlled by the output of a ‘Separate XYZ’ node processing a height input. Tip: The ‘Glossy BSDF’ is useful for simulating reflective surfaces like metals or glass. Fine-tune the roughness to adjust the clarity of reflections.blender node glossy bsdf node setupglossy bsdf cyclesglossy bsdf eevee
HoldoutIn this setup, a ‘Holdout’ shader is used to create a transparent area in the render, effectively cutting out parts of the material. This shader is combined with a Diffuse BSDF using a ‘Mix Shader’ based on an attribute comparison. Tip: The ‘Holdout’ shader is essential for creating alpha cutouts or areas where the material should be completely transparent, such as in masks or matte objects.blender node holdout node setupholdout cyclesholdout eevee
Mix ShaderThis node setup uses a ‘Mix Shader’ to blend between a Diffuse BSDF and a Glossy BSDF based on the input from a ‘Voronoi Texture’. The ‘Separate XYZ’ node breaks down the texture coordinates for more detailed manipulation. Tip: Use the ‘Mix Shader’ to combine different shader types to achieve complex material properties. Adjust the ‘Fac’ value for blending control and optimize performance by fine-tuning the roughness of the shaders.blender node mix shader node setupmix shader cyclesmix shader eevee
Principled BsdfThis configuration uses the Principled BSDF shader, which is an all-in-one shader for creating complex materials. It integrates metallic, specular, and subsurface scattering properties, making it highly versatile. Tip: The Principled BSDF is great for most materials, simplifying the process by combining multiple shaders into one. Use it for realistic materials and tweak the settings to fit specific needs.blender node principled bsdf node setupprincipled bsdf cyclesprincipled bsdf eevee
Principled VolumeThis setup uses the Principled Volume shader to define the volumetric properties of a material, such as density and anisotropy. It can simulate effects like smoke, fog, or even fire. Tip: Utilize the Principled Volume shader for detailed volumetric effects in your scenes. Adjust the density and emission properties to simulate different types of volumes.blender node principled volume node setupprincipled volume cyclesprincipled volume eevee
Refraction BsdfThe Refraction BSDF shader in this setup simulates the bending of light as it passes through a material, essential for creating transparent materials like glass or water. Tip: Use the Refraction BSDF to add realistic light refraction to transparent objects. Adjust the IOR to match the physical properties of the material you are simulating.blender node refraction bsdf node setuprefraction bsdf cyclesrefraction bsdf eevee
Specular BsdfThis node configuration uses the Specular BSDF shader, which focuses on the reflective properties of a material. It’s ideal for simulating surfaces like mirrors or polished metals. Tip: The Specular BSDF shader is excellent for materials with strong reflections. Tweak the roughness and specular settings to achieve the desired level of reflectivity.blender node specular bsdf node setupspecular bsdf cyclesspecular bsdf eevee
Sheen BsdfThe Sheen BSDF shader in this setup is used to create materials with a soft, velvet-like finish, often used for fabrics. It works by adding a layer of microfacet reflections. Tip: Use the Sheen BSDF for materials like cloth or fabric. Adjust the roughness to control the softness of the sheen effect.blender node sheen bsdf node setupsheen bsdf cyclessheen bsdf eevee
Subsurface ScatteringThis node setup employs the Subsurface Scattering (SSS) shader, which simulates the scattering of light within a material, ideal for skin, wax, or marble. Tip: Use Subsurface Scattering to add realism to materials that need to simulate the effect of light scattering beneath the surface. Adjust the radius and scale settings to fine-tune the scattering depth and intensity.blender node subsurface scattering node setupsubsurface scattering cyclessubsurface scattering eevee
Toon BsdfThe Toon BSDF shader in this configuration creates cartoon-like shading with hard shadows and highlights, perfect for non-photorealistic rendering styles. Tip: Use the Toon BSDF for stylized, cartoon-like materials. Adjust the smoothness and size of the highlights to control the sharpness and style of the toon effect.blender node toon bsdf node setuptoon bsdf cyclestoon bsdf eevee
Translucent BsdfThis node setup combines a Translucent BSDF with a Diffuse BSDF using Add Shaders, creating a material that allows light to pass through but diffuses it. Tip: The Translucent BSDF is ideal for materials like leaves or thin fabric that let light pass through. Use the Add Shader to blend it with other BSDFs for more complex materials.blender node translucent bsdf node setuptranslucent bsdf cyclestranslucent bsdf eevee
Transparent BsdfThis node setup blends between a Diffuse BSDF and a Transparent BSDF using a Mix Shader, creating a material that is partially transparent. The ‘Fac’ value controls the mix between the two shaders. Tip: Use this setup to create materials like glass or semi-transparent surfaces. Adjust the ‘Fac’ value to control the transparency level effectively.blender node transparent bsdf node setuptransparent bsdf cyclestransparent bsdf eevee
Volume AbsorptionThis node setup uses the Volume Absorption shader, which is useful for creating effects like colored fog or tinted glass where light is absorbed as it passes through the material. Tip: Use lower density values to reduce render times and avoid overly dark or opaque results, especially in scenes with complex lighting.blender node volume absorption node setupvolume absorption cyclesvolume absorption eevee
Volume ScatterThe Volume Scatter node simulates the scattering of light within a volume, useful for creating effects like smoke or mist. Tip: High density and anisotropy values can significantly increase render times. Optimize by starting with lower values and increasing gradually as needed.blender node volume scatter node setupvolume scatter cyclesvolume scatter eevee
Linear TextureThis setup demonstrates the use of a Gradient Texture with a Linear falloff to create smooth transitions in color or other properties across a surface. Tip: Use gradient textures for background transitions or subtle color changes to minimize the need for complex shaders.blender node linear texture node setuplinear texture cycleslinear texture eevee
Image TextureAn Image Texture node is used to map a texture onto a UV-mapped surface, providing detailed surface information such as color or bump maps. Tip: Optimize texture sizes and formats to balance quality and memory usage, and use compressed textures where possible to improve performance.blender node image texture node setupimage texture cyclesimage texture eevee
Magic TextureThe Magic Texture node generates a psychedelic pattern based on a simple algorithm, ideal for abstract or stylized effects. Tip: The Magic Texture is computationally inexpensive but can create visually complex patterns. Use it for decorative elements where detail is needed without heavy computational cost.blender node magic texture node setupmagic texture cyclesmagic texture eevee
Noise TextureThe Noise Texture node generates a Perlin noise pattern, useful for adding randomness and texture to surfaces. Tip: Adjust the scale and detail parameters to balance between smooth and detailed noise, which can affect both visual quality and performance.blender node noise texture node setupnoise texture cyclesnoise texture eevee
Voronoi TextureThe Voronoi Texture node creates patterns based on cell-like structures, often used for procedural textures like stone or organic patterns. Tip: Use lower detail settings for distant objects or background elements to save on computational resources without sacrificing visual quality.blender node voronoi texture node setupvoronoi texture cyclesvoronoi texture eevee
Wave TextureThis node setup employs the Wave Texture to generate periodic wave patterns, suitable for materials like water or wood grain. Tip: Adjust the scale and distortion parameters to fine-tune the wave appearance while keeping computational load manageable.blender node wave texture node setupwave texture cycleswave texture eevee
BumpThe Bump node adds surface detail to a material by modifying the surface normal based on a height map. Tip: Use bump mapping to simulate complex surface details without increasing mesh complexity, and adjust the strength to avoid overly sharp or unrealistic effects.blender node bump node setupbump cyclesbump eevee
DisplacementThe Displacement node is used to alter the geometry of a mesh based on a texture input, creating detailed surface deformations. Tip: For performance, use displacement in moderation and consider using bump or normal maps for fine details to keep the mesh complexity manageable.blender node displacement node setupdisplacement cyclesdisplacement eevee
NormalThis node setup uses the Normal node to manipulate the surface normals, often used for custom shading effects. Tip: Adjust the strength and direction of the normal manipulation carefully to avoid visual artifacts and maintain realistic shading.blender node normal node setupnormal cyclesnormal eevee
Normal MapThe Normal Map node converts a normal map texture into normal data for shading. Tip: Use high-quality normal maps to enhance surface detail without adding geometric complexity, and ensure the normal map is in the correct color space for accurate results.blender node normal map node setupnormal map cyclesnormal map eevee
Vector CurvesThis setup uses the Vector Curves node to remap vector data, often used for advanced texture manipulations or coordinate adjustments. Tip: Use vector curves for precise control over texture mapping and spatial transformations, but optimize the curve complexity to avoid excessive calculations.blender node vector curves node setupvector curves cyclesvector curves eevee
Vector DisplacementThe Vector Displacement node alters the geometry of a mesh based on a vector texture, allowing for complex deformations. Tip: Use vector displacement for high-detail deformations while balancing performance by optimizing the displacement map resolution and limiting the scale of displacements.blender node vector displacement node setupvector displacement cyclesvector displacement eevee
Vector RotateThis node setup uses the Vector Rotate node to rotate a vector by a specified angle, useful for texture and coordinate adjustments. Tip: Optimize performance by minimizing the number of rotations and combining multiple transformations into a single node when possible.blender node vector rotate node setupvector rotate cyclesvector rotate eevee
Vector TransformThe Vector Transform node is used to convert vectors between different spaces (e.g., world, object, camera). Tip: Use vector transformations to align textures and effects accurately within different coordinate spaces, ensuring transformations are necessary to avoid additional calculations.blender node vector transform node setupvector transform cyclesvector transform eevee
ValueThe Value node outputs a single float value, often used for constants or controlling other node parameters. Tip: Use Value nodes to simplify shader adjustments and maintain consistency, minimizing the need for hardcoded values within the node tree.blender node value node setupvalue cyclesvalue eevee
White Noise TextureThis setup uses the White Noise Texture node to generate random noise, useful for procedural textures and effects. Tip: White noise textures are computationally inexpensive and great for adding randomness, but balance their use to avoid visual noise that can detract from the overall scene quality.blender node white noise texture node setupwhite noise texture cycleswhite noise texture eevee
WireframeThis setup uses the Wireframe node to convert the mesh into a wireframe display, combined with an Emission shader for visibility. Tip: Wireframe nodes can be useful for debugging mesh topology or creating stylized renders, but be cautious with high-density meshes as they can increase computational overhead.blender node wireframe node setupwireframe cycleswireframe eevee
Brightness ContrastThis node setup adjusts the brightness and contrast of an image texture using the Brightness/Contrast node, which then drives an Emission Shader. Tip: Use the Brightness/Contrast node to fine-tune texture colors, enhancing visibility and detail in your renders.blender node brightness contrast node setupbrightness contrast cyclesbrightness contrast eevee
MappingThe Mapping node modifies texture coordinates, allowing for transformations such as translation, rotation, and scaling of the texture. Here, it’s used with an Image Texture driving a Principled BSDF. Tip: Adjust the Mapping node parameters to precisely control the placement and orientation of textures on your models.blender node mapping node setupmapping cyclesmapping eevee
Rgb To BwThis setup converts an image texture to grayscale using the RGB to BW node, which then drives an Emission Shader. Tip: Use the RGB to BW node for quick grayscale conversions, ideal for creating masks or black-and-white effects from color textures.blender node rgb to bw node setuprgb to bw cyclesrgb to bw eevee
Combine Color RgbThe Combine Color RGB node combines separate red, green, and blue values into a single color output, driving an Emission Shader. Tip: Use Combine Color to mix and match RGB values for custom color creation in your node setups.blender node combine color rgb node setupcombine color rgb cyclescombine color rgb eevee
Glass BsdfThe Glass BSDF node simulates the reflective and refractive properties of glass. Here, it’s combined with a Color Ramp to drive its color based on a height value. Tip: Use lower Roughness for clear glass and adjust the IOR (Index of Refraction) for realistic light bending through the material.blender node glass bsdf node setupglass bsdf cyclesglass bsdf eevee

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